Author: adminGPC

Golf Performance Center
14 December
2018
  • December 14, 2018

If You Want to Change Your Game

Do you want to change your score? Then change your perspective!


It’s funny how, and what, we think will make the biggest difference in our golf scores. Many of us will assume that the more we practice and berate ourselves over bad shots, we are “cracking” the whip on improvement, showing everyone we don’t tolerate bad shots or missed putts. Good players don’t miss shots or putts, so we think! 


What is the difference between someone who has made the transition from bad, to good, to great golfer? A lot of people will say it’s natural talent, well, talent may be a part of the equation because it is the most talked about. Maybe it’s good instruction or perhaps luck makes someone great?  Believe it or not, luck does have a part in it! But more importantly than talent, instruction and luck, gratitude has as much, if not more than, anything else. GRATITUDE! 


That’s right, gratitude! Be thankful or grateful for what you have or don’t have because it all matters to who you are! If you can have gratitude every time you play the game or every day that you have the ability to do something that many aren’t able to do, like go outside, and walk a beautiful golf course, gratitude is a freeing experience! It will free you up to accept that not every golf challenge will go your way but many of them will, and when they do, you will be able to think better on the course and off the course. You can make better decisions; your mind is not caught up on being entitled to be your best golfer. Playing with gratitude will allow you to relax the judgement of your shots, not highlight everything you do wrong but rather give some weight to some good shots, too. 

Process, follow your process, the easiest way to find flow state is to follow the same process, to make it automatic. Your process should allow you to always find “home” or a “safe” place to work in. 


Acceptance, we all do not like hitting bad shots but we need to learn how to accept them! They are going to happen! By learning how to accept the consequences, good or bad, it allows us to free up space in our mind to execute to our fullest potential. So the next time you hit a bad shot, act like you knew that may happen and give yourself a few seconds to accept it and move on. When you berate or beat yourself up over bad shots, and never praise yourself for good shots, you will eventually be standing over every shot thinking that you don’t know what is about to happen but it probably won’t be good! Because you are already thinking about what you are going to say to yourself when you hit a bad shot, you do not allow good flow into the shot.    


In conclusion, be kind to yourself. It doesn’t mean you can’t be disappointed in hitting a bad shot, but also be ready to give yourself some praise for a good shot! The game is hard and the competition fierce, so enjoy the game!


As always, 
Enjoy Your Journey!

 

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Feedback
14 December
2018
  • December 14, 2018

Feedback

One of the most challenging endeavors in all of sport is to change an ingrained motor pattern in an effort to become better. Nowhere do we see this challenge greater than we do in the game of golf.


Understanding what needs to be done is the first step and a critical one. After that, addressing any physical limitations and improving function is also vital to the improvement process. When physical function has improved, certain tendencies may still remain as they are hard-wired into the central nervous system, making them very difficult to reprogram. However, this does not mean that it is impossible.


Receiving consistent feedback as you move through the improved movement is vital. Many golfers continue to work on drills in an effort to make a change, yet do so without the proper feedback. They are simply fooling themselves into thinking that they are making the improved motion until a coach or video tells them otherwise. This is why most people who understand what needs to be done and can physically make the movement still cannot make the change into automatic motion.


Designing an off season practice plan that includes the proper feedback mechanisms is a critical step to making the necessary changes. Ultimately, practicing with instant feedback will help you to increase your awareness more quickly and help you override the old tendencies. Coaching, training aids, video, and 3D biofeedback systems (See Alex on K-Vest in the photo above) are all great ways to receive instant feedback.


Take the time to write down the changes that need to be made, the drills that you will perform, and the feedback mechanism that you will be using as you go through the drills. This will make for a much more productive off season.

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Using the Ground
14 December
2018
  • December 14, 2018

Using the Ground

With the off season fast approaching, it is a good time to begin working on improving movement at a fundamental level, and there is no better place to begin doing that than at the ground. As a golfer moves through the golf swing, pressure is being applied into the ground at different places in the feet, giving the golfer the leverage to move dynamically. Gaining a better understanding of and improving upon where the pressure is in the feet at different points in the swing can vastly affect the efficiency of the golf swing.

A great way to begin understanding how you are using the ground is to get captured on a pressure mat. This will show you exactly where you are applying the most pressure into the ground and, with the proper expert interpretation, can give you clues as to why you have certain swing tendencies. With that information, you can begin to train to improve where you are applying pressure as you move through the golf swing. There is no better way to do this than to take slow swings barefoot.


Taking slow swings with no shoes on can really allow you to focus on the feet and feeling the pressure points in the ground. The more slow swings you do, the more you will understand how ground forces affect how you move. The great Sam Snead was known for practicing with no shoes on and even played nine holes at Augusta National once to regain his balance and rhythm. Snead still holds the record for the most PGA Tour victories of all time with 82 (we’ll see if Tiger can catch him).

Practice Smart!

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Drive Your CARs
14 December
2018
  • December 14, 2018

Drive Your CARs

This week I would like to discuss one tool that can be used to help you get healthy, stay healthy, and improve your range of motion and functional mobility efficiently. Maintaining range of motion in a joint, and having the ability to use that range of motion, is the goal of the work we put in the gym, now how do you do it? 

Controlled Articular Rotations (CARs) are defined as active, rotational movements at the outer limits of articular motion that allow a person to self-assess, and regularly test their ability to achieve more range of motion in a joint. To put it VERY simply (as there is more involved with CARs), they would fall under the category of joint circles (i.e., hip circles, arm circles, wrist circles, or neck circles). CARs can be used for range of motion maintenance, to achieve articular health and longevity, and for rehabilitation purposes. They can be done with no equipment, at any joint, in a short period of time, and performed frequently enough to be able to see and feel the differences in the new range of motion you’re able to achieve. It is important that when doing these exercises, you avoid any pinching or pain in the joint. If you feel this, simply avoid the spot that is causing the pain and continue with the rotation (skip over it, if you will). They can be executed using various levels of isometric “resistance” to elicit improved joint adaptation in the long run, resulting in more range of motion. Ultimately, CARs are a versatile tool in the toolbox that can help you get to the next level with your mobility goals.

As much as I can stress the importance of incorporating CARs into yourperformance plan, a simple paragraph or two will not do this method or style of exercise justice. I highly encourage you to reach out to Kyle or myself to experience CARs firsthand and go over how to do them on your own at home. I am confident you will see and feel the difference in your ability to move better, giving you the freedom to achieve the positions necessary in the golf swing to make you the most efficient golf athlete you can be. 

See you in the Zone!
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That Which Can Be Measured Can Be Improved
14 December
2018
  • December 14, 2018

“That Which Can Be Measured Can
Be Improved”

Golf is a very difficult game. We all know how frustrating it can be when the result of your shots is not what you envisioned. Improving your overall physical performance can be just as difficult and it too becomes frustrating when your work in the gym is not seeming to progress at the pace you had planned. All is not lost in either situation, however, and if you want to find success and ultimately reach your goals your mindset must be adaptable. I encourage you to be open to the fact that there is no “cookie cutter” way to mastering the game of golf, nor your quality of movement, strength, and power. This does not mean you have to settle or lower your standards, it simply means not everyone’s roadmap will look the same.


At GPC we offer countless feedback tools to allow our golf athletes the ability to quantify their improvement. We trust the feedback of numerous pieces of technology as we help our athletes develop. From K-Vest, BodiTrak, GEARs, and SAM PuttLab, to the Functional Movement Screen, a variety of golf specific screens, and physical proficiencies (like your vertical jump, sit up and throw, and medicine ball shot put throw on the physical side), we are able to quantify the lead factors that result in lower scoring averages down the road.


In an ideal world, your scoring average would drop significantly each year, but this game isn’t easy. In fact, scoring average is the LAST area where improvement will be reflected. It is important to consider the positive changes you have made on the way to the bigger picture and how those puzzle pieces will ultimately be put together to get you the results you have been working so hard for.


I encourage everyone to schedule an updated physical evaluation so we can gather baseline numbers for the off-season and determine where you need to dedicate more time in the coming months.


See you in the Zone!

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Golf Performance Center
14 December
2018
  • December 14, 2018

Incremental Gains = Compound
Results

It is a common understanding that when we invest time, money or emotions in small portions with the overall goal of improvement over time, results get better in small doses. Then the explosion happens! We begin gaining greater results with similar or the same the efforts applied in the first place; this would be called compounding over time. The knowledge and experiences we gain, present and future, build depth. The more we apply information, effort or interest our ability grows faster, stronger and better.  It is like giving a player the power to perform at a higher level before he/she does but because a player has not learned how to apply the knowledge to their game, it may go unnoticed.  An example of this would be going through a growth spurt. It happens constantly but most people never notice until the growth spurt slows down or stops, then it is like, wow my clothes don’t fit or you begin getting comments of how much you have grown or changed! 

 

So, what does this mean for your golf game? It means be patient, strive to improve in small increments, follow a consistent path, be curious to learn and not be fixed. Golf is a simple game that unfortunately due to so much conflicting information has gotten to be complicated for golfers of all skill levels. Think about it like this, if you enrolled in school for the 3rd grade, when you completed that year it’s not expected for you to go straight to the 12th grade, or at least not in my school anyway! Instead it is a slow steady process that takes years of knowledge to accumulate, therefore compounding knowledge and improving one’s ability to perform well in testing environments or make better decisions later in life. Learning golf should be a similar progression of incremental learning, compounding knowledge and experiences to improve one’s ability to perform. Unfortunately, for many golfers learning the game can be frustrating because often much of the time is spent on fixing the swing or being taught about how to become like a great golfer vs learning how to use the equipment and what their ultimate goal is for learning the game in the first place.  

 

What ever your reason for wanting to be better at golf, a recreational player to a highly competitive player, it is important to know trying to improve your swing to play better golf does not work under the premise of fixing your swing or I took a lesson so I am fixed. Playing better golf takes time, it takes lots of knowledge of the game and situations that you may or may not have ever had.  Golf is a repetitive sport, but we never have the same shot twice! So, take the time to learn small pieces, even though you think it may be taking forever, it will quickly take shape and combining your experiences, knowledge and learned skills your scores will come sooner and better than you can imagine! Be patient! 

 

As always, 
Enjoy Your Journey!

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mastery in the short game
19 November
2018
  • November 19, 2018

Mastery in the Short Game

Many people wonder how some golfers are able to practice the same thing for long periods of time. The reality is that every shot is different to some degree and if you look at the subtle nuances that are relevant in a short game shot there is plenty to keep the mind engaged. Let’s discuss the process of a productive short game practice session.

 

A great first step to a productive short game session is to select a specific shot that needs to be worked on. Be as specific as possible; for example, a long bunker shot off of firm sand to a back pin. After selecting the shot the second step is the experimental phase where there is freedom to explore and find out what works. This phase can last as long as needed, or until there is clarity on preferences. The next step is spending time to groove the improved approach to the shot until it feels ready for battle. This brings you to the final step where you can test yourself with a result based challenge. This could be getting 3 in a row inside 5 feet or 4 out of 5 inside 6 feet, just make sure the skill/challenge ratio is correct based on your skill level and the difficulty of the shot.

 

I believe that the greatest skill in golf is the ability to improve oneself. If you are someone who finds it hard to stay engaged in practice for long periods of time then use this simple process to keep you going. There is always more to the puzzle – something more subtle, more simple, more efficient. You just have to keep looking more closely and asking the question ‘Why?’

 

Practice Smart!

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12 November
2018
  • November 12, 2018

HOW MUCH BOUNCE?

“Function Dictates Form”

We believe in this philosophy as the backbone to both our golf and physical coaching at GPC. It’s hard to argue the fact that a golfer’s physical abilities (or inabilities) will determine how they move the club, and more specifically, their ability to find and maintain proper posture in the golf swing. Dynamic posture can be defined as maintaining efficient movement mechanics throughout the various positions in the golf swing. In other words, maintaining a consistent posture once the club begins to move even the slightest bit. Once speed is introduced to a move like the golf swing, any physical limitations you possess, along with the movement patterns that have been ingrained over time, will force your body into the positions it feels most “comfortable.” For starters, these “comfortable” positions result in huge energy leaks, let alone potential for injury through a resulting compensation somewhere else in the chain of moving parts.

I make a point to mention two particular areas to anyone going through our 5 Elements of Success Evaluation that will affect their ability to maintain dynamic posture; the flexibility and range of motion of the lats and hamstrings. If these two large muscle groups are tight and restricting, your movement will cause a resulting loss of posture seen in either a flat shoulder path or the hips extending too early in the golf swing. These two swing characteristics are just a piece of the puzzle that could not only cause very inconsistent ball striking, but tight lats and hamstrings are also prominent in those dealing with shoulder issues and low back pain as they affect the proper function of these segments of your body as well. Spend extra time stretching both your lats and your hamstrings each week to give yourself the best opportunity at staying in posture and achieve the positions necessary for an efficient golf swing.

See you in the Zone!

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11 November
2018
  • November 11, 2018

LAT IT GO

“Function Dictates Form”

We believe in this philosophy as the backbone to both our golf and physical coaching at GPC. It’s hard to argue the fact that a golfer’s physical abilities (or inabilities) will determine how they move the club, and more specifically, their ability to find and maintain proper posture in the golf swing. Dynamic posture can be defined as maintaining efficient movement mechanics throughout the various positions in the golf swing. In other words, maintaining a consistent posture once the club begins to move even the slightest bit. Once speed is introduced to a move like the golf swing, any physical limitations you possess, along with the movement patterns that have been ingrained over time, will force your body into the positions it feels most “comfortable.” For starters, these “comfortable” positions result in huge energy leaks, let alone potential for injury through a resulting compensation somewhere else in the chain of moving parts.

I make a point to mention two particular areas to anyone going through our 5 Elements of Success Evaluation that will affect their ability to maintain dynamic posture; the flexibility and range of motion of the lats and hamstrings. If these two large muscle groups are tight and restricting, your movement will cause a resulting loss of posture seen in either a flat shoulder path or the hips extending too early in the golf swing. These two swing characteristics are just a piece of the puzzle that could not only cause very inconsistent ball striking, but tight lats and hamstrings are also prominent in those dealing with shoulder issues and low back pain as they affect the proper function of these segments of your body as well. Spend extra time stretching both your lats and your hamstrings each week to give yourself the best opportunity at staying in posture and achieve the positions necessary for an efficient golf swing.

See you in the Zone!

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